Sarah Jacobs

Coordinator, Special Projects

 SARAH JACOBS is the LOSH Evaluation and Materials Development Coordinator and the West Coast Program Coordinator for the Occupational Health Internship Program (OHIP). Jacobs recently completed a Materials Development and Assessment Project for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The project involved creating two Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) documents for use in Mexican Consulates’ Ventanilla de Salud (VDS) program, developing a criteria checklist for assessing Spanish-language OSH materials and collecting, cataloguing, and evaluating such materials. She also recently revised a six-page Hazard Evaluation System and Information Service brochure for the California Department of Public Health on preventing job-related injuries for sewing machine operators.

Currently, Jacobs works with different OSH projects including (1) coordination and evaluation of a five-year HazMat training program for ILWU members from West Coast ports and (2) collaborating with the Labor Occupational Health Program on the School Action for Safety and Health (SASH) Program where she is developing a school emergency preparedness factsheet and will conduct Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) trainings to school employees. As the OHIP West Coast Program Coordinator she is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the internship in California and coordinating with regional and national staff.

Since graduating from Indiana University in 2000 with a degree in Public Health Education and before receiving her Master’s Degree in Public Health at UCLA in June of 2008, she gained experience working in various capacities in the field of public health. During her undergraduate years, she worked as a summer intern for the Ventura County Public Health Department and was a Health Education Assistant for the Tobacco Resource Inspection Program at Indiana University.

In 2002 she became a Peace Corps Volunteer in Guatemala and acquired two and a half years of field experience working as a Health Educator in two rural Mayan elementary schools where she taught basic health habits. She also initiated several community development projects including the establishment of an indigenous woman’s cooking group, a lice treatment project for preschool children and supervised the construction of hand-washing stations.

After Peace Corps and her subsequent travels in South America, she returned to the United States where she worked for the County of Ventura as a Health Care Worker for the Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program. She facilitated one-on-one obstetric care to low-income, Spanish-speaking, pregnant and post-partum women. In the summer of 2007 she was an OHIP Intern and finished her last year of graduate school working at LOSH as a Graduate Student Researcher.